OGC approves new standard for geological science data

The membership of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) has approved GeoSciML as an OGC Standard. The OGC GeoSciML Standard defines a model and encoding for geological features commonly described and portrayed in geological maps, cross sections, geological reports, and databases.
GeoSciML provides a mechanism for storage and exchange of a broad range of geologic data enabling users to generate geologic depictions (such as maps) in a consistent and repeatable fashion.
The model was developed by the IUGS CGI (Commission for the Management and Application of Geoscience Information) and version 4.1 is the first version officially submitted as an OGC standard. This standard describes a logical model and GML/XML encoding rules for geological map data, geological time scales, boreholes, and metadata for laboratory analyses.
“Earlier versions of GeoSciML have been used for several years by geological data sharing projects around the world when GeoSciML was only an IUGS (International Union of Geological Sciences) standard. These include OneGeology, INSPIRE, the US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN), and the Australian AuScope and AusGIN projects,” said Ollie Raymond, chair of the GeoSciML SWG. “Having GeoSciML version 4 ratified as an official OGC standard is a huge step forward for GeoSciML, particularly to reassure application developers that GeoSciML is the way forward for geoscience data transfer. The collaboration of the previous IUGS GeoSciML working group and OGC has been a great example of effective cooperation between standards organisations.”
Maria Glícia da Nóbrega Coutinho the Head of the International Affairs Office of CPRM (The Geological Survey of Brazil) and OneGeology Board representative for South America said: “The formal documentation and approval of the GeoSciML 4.1 standards by OGC allows us to expand the exchange of highly interoperable geoscience data throughout the South American continent with the support of the OneGeology standards support network and allowed us to achieve the maximum 5 stars of OneGeology interoperability.”
The GeoSciML standard includes a Lite model, used for simple map-based applications; a basic model, aligned with INSPIRE, for basic data exchange; and an extended model to address more complex scenarios. The standard also provides patterns, profiles (most notably of OGC Observations and Measurements – also ISO 19156), and best practices to deal with common geoscience use cases.
More information on the GeoSciML standard, including schemas, can be found at www.opengeospatial.org/standards/geosciml.
About the OGC
The OGC is an international consortium of more than 525 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that “geo-enable” the Web, wireless and location based services, and mainstream IT. OGC standards empower technology developers to make geospatial information and services accessible and useful with any application that needs to be geospatially enabled. Visit the OGC website at www.opengeospatial.org.

Guideline – Surveys Relating to Property Boundaries

The Surveyors Board of Queensland has identified that there is uncertainty across both industry and the community in respect to when a registered cadastral surveyor is required to identify a property boundary. This guideline has been distributed to numerous organisations associated with the building and development industries.

You can access the guideline via the Board website, and you are welcome to print copies and promote it to your clients or other related parties.

The Board’s website also contains the definition of a cadastral survey and who can carry out a cadastral survey. It can be accessed here.

Marketing/Advertising Cadastral Surveying Services

The Board has become aware that web-based service providers are offering a contact service between the public and tradespeople. Some service providers include listings for surveying services including land surveying. The Board has noted that some persons who are not registered cadastral surveyors are listed as providing land surveying services. The Board will be writing to the web-based service providers to advise the legislative requirements, specifically that only registered consulting cadastral surveyors can market their services and charge a fee for a cadastral survey.

The Board is also aware that some surveying businesses are marketing the provision of cadastral services when the surveying business is not registered with the Board as a consulting cadastral surveyor (e.g. via their business webpage or the Yellow Pages). Under the Surveyors Act 2003, such businesses cannot provide cadastral surveying services to the public, which includes marketing, advertising or implying that they provide, or can procure, cadastral services.

When contacted by the Board, these surveying firms are advising that they refer any cadastral work to a registered consulting surveyor. Where a surveyor refers a person to a registered consulting surveyor for cadastral work, it must be on the basis that the person would become a client of the consulting surveyor, who would manage all future dealings with the client.

International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 to boost collaboration

Sydney, Australia – 7 March 2017 – With driverless vehicles and drones poised for mass adoption, the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney in April provides a forum for government, industry and start-ups to collaborate and become players in the emerging global Smart Cities industry.

“Mobility as a Service is transforming our cities and the spatial industry and technology start-ups are key parts of that,” says Susan Harris, CEO of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Australia.

Harris – the keynote speaker for the Digital Earth & Locate17 conference’s Intelligent Transport stream – will outline the latest global developments and the pathways for Australia to leverage connected and automated vehicles, big data and positioning technologies.

“We need to be ready in Australia. We are well placed to be part of the global Smart Cities technology industry, creating business opportunities and ensuring that our cities remain as liveable as they can be,” says Harris. “But technology is moving very quickly and early collaboration is vital.”

The capture and exchange of rich 2D and 3D spatial information will increasingly underpin transport networks and cities. Driverless vehicles, for example, will constantly survey road conditions – sharing information about potholes, ice and other hazards  – so other driverless vehicles, and human drivers, can avoid them.

Even minor road damage like cracks will be captured and shared so authorities can schedule repairs and prevent further deterioration. Drones will also play an increasing role in the capture of 3D data, and later as a new layer of autonomous transport.

“How does that spatial information get captured, managed and shared back out in ways that are reliable, safe, and commercially viable?” says Harris. “Australia is strong in both positioning technologies and big data, but we need to develop further skills and industry collaboration, including information sharing arrangements.”

With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, Digital Earth & Locate17 provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data.

The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy.

The joint conference will be held 03-06 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney. The Digital Earth & Locate17 Conference’s Market Day on Tuesday 4th April opens the exhibition to everyone and is an opportunity for private, government and start-up organisations to come together and explore collaborative and business opportunities.

About the International Symposium on Digital Earth
The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth.

ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards.

About Locate17
The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA).

Media Contact
Chris Bowes
Bowes Communications
+61 2 9387 2332
chris.bowes@bowespr.com

2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda action plan released for comment

The 2026Agenda team would like to thank those of you who have contributed to the draft action plan with feedback and suggestions.

The Action Plan presents 32 high priority initiatives and a roadmap to drive the 2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda. This draft Action Plan has been created in consultation with the Australian spatial sector.

Since it started in July 2016, the 2026Agenda has engaged more than 400 individuals, through a combination of Leadership Forums across Australia and one-on-one interviews with representatives of priority sectors including agriculture, health, transport and energy. Online consultation has also occurred.

All 2026Agenda activities to date have been coordinated by a working group jointly chaired by SIBA and the CRC for Spatial Information, including representatives of ANZLIC, Australian Earth Observation Community Coordinating Group (EOCCG), Data 61 (CSIRO), Landgate, Geoscience Australia, the Queensland Department of Natural Resources and Mines, and the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Next steps

The final Action Plan will be released in the first quarter of 2017, along with a comprehensive resources document including:

  1. Detail, rationale and ideas for implementation of the 2026Agenda framework and initiatives
  2. Detailed feedback from the national consultation including the barriers to growth, the needs and the many suggestions that have led to the development of the vision
  3. An explanation of technical details and acronyms.

Call for action
The 2026Agenda team is coordinating the implementation of initiatives which will commence in 2017. We are seeking participants willing to take a leading role in this next phase.
If you or your organisation wants to help drive this transformation:

For more details, and to consult the supporting documentation, please visit the 2026Agenda website: www.2026agenda.com or send us an e-mail at info@2026agenda.com
Download a copy of the 2026Agenda Action Plan

Kind Regards

Eva Rodriguez and Phil Delaney
The 2026 Agenda Team
info@2026agenda.com
www.2026agenda.com

Industry owned Quality Assurance returns with new Global-Mark partnership

Consulting Surveyors Quality Control (CSQC) has been providing tailored and specialized services to our clients in the spatial and construction industry since 1993.

CSQC are a for-profit company with all dividends returned to our shareholder SIBA at end of financial year.

Global-Mark Pty Ltd (a Sydney based JASANZ Accredited Certification Body) entered into an agreement with CSQC to partner in the delivery of certification and training services.

Herve Michoux, Global-Mark’s Managing Director says “We welcome CSQC to our team and we look forward to welcoming the CSQC team and Clients to our organisation. We will be able to make an immediate difference. I have great confidence in the integrity of our work and our ability to add value to CSQC Client’s”.

Malcolm Lester, CSQC Chairman added “We are very pleased to have joined Global-Mark: this is a new, innovative and diverse company, and having known Herve for many years, we now have an opportunity to put our efforts together and create something new, responsive and efficient.  For us it is a new start, and we are already enjoying the integration into the Global-Mark team”.

For Clients that wish to transfer to Global-Mark, the process is very simple and free.  It typically takes 5 to 10 working days, and there is no need for a special audit.

For more information please contact

CSQC:
0435797186 / enquiries@csqc.com.au / www.csqc.com.au

Global-Mark:
02 9886 0222 / 1300 766 509 / CSQC@Global-Mark.com.au or info@csqc.com.au / www.global-mark.com.au

Geospatial data’s enabling role in digital transformation will be on show at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17

Sydney, Australia – 1 February 2017 – Geospatial data’s enabling role in digital transformation will be on show at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney in April, combining one of the world’s most prestigious symposiums with Australia’s premier geospatial conference.

Dr Zaffar Sadiq Mohamed-Ghouse, chair & convenor of the Locate17 and Digital Earth Symposium Organising Committee, says attendees will come away with the knowledge to transform business practices in industries as diverse as agriculture, transport, construction and medicine.

“Both government and the private sector will be able to identify opportunities based on what is happening around the world,” he says. “Geospatial data underpins many disruptive and innovative organisations. Without it, companies like Uber would not be in business.”

According to Dr Mohamed-Ghouse, who is also director for NSW & International Relations of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI), the event comes as governments around Australia open up access to geospatial data to promote innovation.

Australia’s now freely available Geo-coded National Address File is used online to validate people’s addresses. The biggest Australian subscriber group for the Global Navigation Satellite System is not transport or surveyors, but the agricultural industry.

With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, Digital Earth & Locate17 provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data.

The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy.

Some of the symposium’s highlights include:

  • Susan Moran from NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive Science Team presents a special session on remote sensing and applications of global soil moisture monitoring
  • Trisha Moriarty, Geological Survey of NSW delivers a keynote on the application of open data policy in the Earth Sciences across government, scientific and industry
  • Singapore Land Authority & AAM presents, ‘Singapore Smart Nation: Measuring from the ground up’
  • David Wortley, Gamification and Enabling Technologies Strategic Solutions, delivers, ‘The role of Digital Earth technologies in digital medicine’.

The joint conference will be held 03-06 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney.

About the International Symposium on Digital Earth
The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth.

ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards.

About Locate17
The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA).

Media Contact
Chris Bowes
Bowes Communications
+61 2 9387 2332
chris.bowes@bowespr.com